Developments

the Orionid Meteor Shower

I set up my camera to try and capture meteors on October 21st, pointed it in the direction of Orion, and took video for 5-20 minutes at a time (mostly going back in the house to avoid the cold).

In total I think I had around an hour and a half of footage. But who wants to star at a screen for an hour, looking for meteors? So instead I stacked the frames, in groups of 500, and looked for indicative streaks—and I spotted 6 of them! Since it was originally 4K, I cropped each of them to 1920x1080, and about 10 seconds, and put them together into this video:

Before these 6 meteors I had only caught one other, back in the Summer, the night before I was due to return the rented lens. I was trying to spot the Andromeda Galaxy (because what else are you going to do with such a telephoto lens?) and I happened to catch a meteor streaking near the Pleiades star cluster (I think?).

The Geminids are due to peak this Wednesday/Thursday (13th/14th) night (best around 1 am), and I was working on modifying a styrofoam cooler to keep my camera warm, but I'm skeptical it'll be done in time.

The American Meteor Society has a list of all the meteor showers and where to look for them.

bad news

I'm writing this because it's a lot of nuance to tell everyone individually. To summarize, a few weeks ago my blood counts started to drop so they did a biopsy last Tuesday and today I got the results: it looks like I still have some leukemia cells. There are a variety of possible treatments they're looking at (they choose depending on the details of what is happening). The rest of this is a more detailed explanation of those points.

(Also the original title of this post was "less than ideal news" until I realized I used that same title last year when I relapsed. So this post is more blunt instead.) 

My appointments were cut back to monthly in mid-August. The September appointment went fine, but in the first week of October my counts had declined, and my doctor was concerned. So the next week they did a bone marrow biopsy, and today he told me the preliminary results, which is that I have myelodyplastic syndrome, which is a fancy way of saying that my body isn't producing blood cells in the right amounts, which is probably because there are still leukemia cells floating around. (MDS and leukemia are not identical, I think there are a variety of causes of MDS, but since I had leukemia a year ago that's the obvious conclusion. Sometimes MDS become leukemia later. Also, I already knew about MDS a little because I know Carl Sagan had it. Turns out he died of pneumonia, but I think it was probably as a complication. Huh, he had three bone marrow transplants from his sister. The two things I have going that he didn't are, I'm almost 30 years younger than he was, and there has been an extra 20 years of learning in the medical community. In spite of those, we still haven't gotten that good at this.)

As a little review, the cells in our bone marrow produce our blood, red blood cells that carry oxygen, white blood cells that fight infection, and all sorts of other stuff, like platelets, which form clots when we're bleeding. Leukemia is the result of one of those bone marrow cells dividing out of control, instead of maturing into an adult blood cell. The immature cells are called blasts, and I think typically you don't really see any blast cells in the "peripheral blood" (the blood in your veins). To diagnose leukemia they do a bone marrow biopsy, they use a needle to get a sample of my bone marrow (from the bones in my lower back, which are easy to get to, cause I'm boney), and then they count up the blast cells.

A leukemia diagnoses is when 20% or more of the cells in the bone marrow sample are blasts (normally they expect 5% or less to be blast cells). My biopsy last week had about 6% blasts, so it's not exactly considered a relapse, and that's why it's considered MDS. (When I was diagnosed last year it was 100% blasts, and at that point they were circulating through my peripheral blood too, so a hematologist that I still have never met knew when he saw it that I had leukemia, and he called me and told me I needed to go to a big hospital right away. After the first chemotherapy I still had 5% blasts, which is why they did a second "induction" chemotherapy.)

So what will we do about it?

To start we'll try and induce some graft-vs-host-disease. Since the transplant last November, the main concern (besides the leukemia coming back), was that the new donor cells I received could attack me as if I were a foreign invader (this is what HLA typing is for; my donor was a half match). So until today I've been taking some immunosuppressant drugs, which slow down the white blood cells and make them less likely to attack me. The upside is that sometimes they see a graft-vs-tumor effect, where the new donor cells attack any remaining leukemia cells as invaders. That's the plan right now.

Next week we'll see if that's helping, and they'll probably do another biopsy in a few weeks. There are a lot of other options, but which we pursue might depend on how things go in the near future. There are some new drugs that might help, some new chemotherapy drugs, and some that might help induce graft-vs-host (and hopefully also graft-vs-tumor). Another possibility is that they might collect some adult T cells from my donor (a cousin on my dad's side). It'd be a small amount, because they can be quite dangerous to me, and once they put them in they can't take them back out. 

That's pretty much all we discussed.

I mentioned how the results were preliminary, the other part is called cytogenetic analysis, which involves sequencing the genome (probably just part of it), in the leukemia cells, to see which mutations they might have. Some mutations are known to be vulnerable to certain drugs, so if any such mutations are identified they will likely dictate how we respond. They cytogenetics should be complete sometime over the next week or so.

Short digression, I'm watching a David Attenborough BBC show about predators, and the first episode just ended with cheetahs, following a mother with four cubs, and they mentioned that 90% of cheetah cubs don't survive to their second birthday. 

The original cytogenetic analysis from last year found an inversion on chromosome three, which is associated with a poor prognosis, and not long ago I read on quora how leukemias are among the fastest cancers, which is both good and bad. Good because chemotherapy drugs are specifically chemicals that interfere with cell division (since that's what cancers are), and by dividing so rapidly they're more vulnerable to chemicals that are really good at killing young cells. The downside is that because they divide so rapidly, they also develop resistance quickly. When I relapsed last summer they used a different chemotherapy drug, because whatever cells survived the previous treatments were most likely to have some mutation that made them resistant to the previous chemotherapy drugs.

That's pretty much all I have to say about my health situation.

The second episode of that show (I think it's called Hunt?), I think he just said polar bears are only successful in 1 out of every 20 hunts. A failure rate of 95%!

So in light of this (my health), I'm focusing my work and time on things I enjoy, and which I think are achievable. Which has meant more curved-crease origami, and less programming. (Because a lot of my programming projects I'm unsure will ever pan out.) Spending time with friends. I should probably order a bunch of 3D models printed.

Okay, now a polar bear is climbing around an incredibly steep cliffs, eating bird eggs & hatchlings. First I was really worried for the bear, he's so high up, and it's ridiculously steep and crumbly. But then I'm watching him just slowly eating every egg and bird he can get near, and the birds are helplessly squawking at him, inches away as he eats their babies. I think there is something I find comforting about being reminded of how nature works. No matter how much time I have left, it's really unlikely I'll be eaten alive, or starve to death, which is what most animals deal with every day for their entire lives.

I've always loved nature programs. Though even as a little kid I remember feeling really bad seeing animals get caught. I'm not sure when it occurred to me that the animals chasing them had to eat too. 

long Time No Update!

Haven't updated since... May 25th‽ Lots has happened, my appoints went from weekly, to every other week, to monthly (next week will be my second monthly appointment). I think my next bone marrow biopsy is around a year, so mid to late November. I've had a few therapeutic phlebotomies (bleedings) so far, but I'll probably need to continue them for a bit over a year. 

Went to Wyoming (flew to Chicago with Collin, where we met Corey, and we drove to Wyoming!) to see the solar eclipse in August. All I wanted for my birthday was for the Sun to block out the Moon for about two minutes, and I got it!

Also, we watched the eclipse on a hilltop in Wyoming, on a lake shore, with about 10 other people, I think maybe all of them were from Colorado. Jenny was one of them, she left a comment on my main page, and then I did something that messed up the comment section on the main page, and I haven't figured out how to fix it yet.

I spent a lot of time trying to motion stabilize the footage of the eclipse, with mixed results. I shot it in 4K with a Sony A7S ii and a 150-600mm Sigma lens (with a Canon to Sony E-mount adapter) I rented from lensrentals.com. I used opencv to find circles, but that didn't quite work as well as I hoped. Then I used contour detection, with fairly good results. And then there is the issue of cropping. A month has already gone by since the eclipse, so I've set that aside and the video is here now.

And the plane crossing it, that was incredible! In the video, shortly after the eclipse starts, the screen goes black. I was watching the LCD when that happened, and my first thought was, "did the camera just die‽ how could it die right now‽" You can hear, I think Collin, saying how the plane is headed straight for it. I looked at the lens and saw that the breeze had blown the solar filter back in front of the camera, and I managed to flip it back off the lens just in time to get the plane crossing. Later Collin looked up flights for that area and we found two commercial flights that went directly over us during the eclipse, and in the video there are, I think, a couple times where you hear someone mention there are two planes. Collin once, and one of the other women later I think. She also says something about how the plane looks like it's steering to see the eclipse, and I think at the time both Collin and I thought she meant they had flown into the shadow, and we figured that was planned. But looking at the flight paths later, it looked as if one of the planes banked sharply to one side, then the other, and then back again, possibly to show the passengers? The result looks like a big bump in the flight path, which otherwise is headed north east to south west across the country. 

I ended up buying the Sony I rented, and they're notorious good at shooting video in low light (the reason I rented it). The night before I returned the lens I decided to look for Andromeda, and I didn't know how easy it is to spot. The app I was using to look for it was so filled with stars I had trouble orienting it right, and decided to look at the Pleiades star cluster first, and I happened to catch a meteor on camera.

Recently I've been working on another variation of minesweeper again, and I just now learned a little tiny bit more of Swift, which is actually what prompted me to post. I figured if I write about what I learned I'd be more likely to remember it. It involves the concept of in-out parameters for functions. I had run into them in the past, but didn't understand what they were doing, but the examples I just read were clear. 

I also started by trying to figure out what was meant by some code, a class named Array2D<T>, which it turns out is a generic type. Generic types (apparently) let you write code that will be more flexible than normal, like the way an array type can take integers, floats, strings, etc., as members, that's what makes them generic. The explanation of generic types involved in-out parameters, which if my understanding is right, are sort of like functions that will change the values of parameters. I think they're kind of like a shortcut of having a function return modified values and setting the variable you pass into the function equal to the returned value. To use an in-out parameter you must write inout after the parameter name in the function declaration, and when you call it you use an ampersand to denote the inout variable. Here's the documentation for in-out parameters. And here is the documentation for generic types.  (Generic code I guess.)

I also revisited an idea I've had for a long time, and worked on quite a bit a few years ago, involving trying to generate point clouds from a video with a pull focus. I managed to get an iPhone app working that would perform a pull focus, and then wrote some opencv code to pull out the in-focus parts, but it does a terrible job. After the bad first attempts I remembered how years ago I read about a simple method for focus stacking (a related problem), that consisted of blurring the photo and subtracting the blurred result from the original. The idea being that the in-focus parts change the most during blurring, and the out-of-focus parts don't change much, so the result is mostly the parts that were in focus. But the results of that were pretty horrendous too. I also had the color off when I made the video below. 

When I return to it again I'll try implementing something like the contrast-based approach to autofocusing. I suppose something I should keep in mind is that, ideally, each pixel will result in only one point, so I really want to look through the "column" of pixels (a single pixel over the duration of the video), and select the one with the highest contrast? That doesn't sound terrible...

Current Events

So I haven't written any updates in a quite a while again. Things have been going well. I had my first therapeutic phlebotomy (blood letting!) a couple weeks ago and it went fine, turns out they take about 500 mL, and they'll keep doing that monthly as long as I am healthy and iron levels remain high. The actual procedure only took maybe 10 minutes, but then there was some waiting before and after, mostly to make sure I felt okay. 

They also made an appointment for me to get an IVIg (intravenous immunoglobulin) infusion in another few weeks. I guess immunoglobulin is the antibody our immune systems use to attack invaders, and it's pretty common for post-transplant patients to have low levels, so this is all still pretty routine. 

They started giving me vaccinations too, which they had told me I would need eventually, around 6 months post transplant (which is about where I am). 

Otherwise things seem to be proceeding about as well as can be expected. They've been reducing the immunosuppressants and I'm on pretty low levels now. I think I've had very minor signs of graft-vs-host, some rashes on the backs of my hands that come and go over the course of a few days. Last fall, before the transplant, I was watching videos and reading about the process, and many patients mentioned how some small signs of GvHD are encouraging because it means the new immune system is working, and there is even a graft-vs-tumor effect whereby the grafted immune system can attack any leukemia cells that remained. 

The one minor weak point is that I still haven't gained any weight, but my appetite is pretty much back to normal, I just need to focus more on eating more constantly. Small meals still but more frequent.

Outside of health issues, I renewed my drivers license finally! And I've been working on modeling polyhedra of all sorts, and getting many more models printed. Right now I have some earrings and pendant designs being made, hopefully this iteration is nice enough that I can start making them for sale!

These are some of the objects I've been working on: stellated polyhedra derivativespolyhedra addiction, and crisscrossed tetrahedron

I also started working on a game involving hyperbolic geometry, but I quickly realized I didn't know enough of the geometry to make what I needed, so I have to go back and learn a lot more before I can return to that.

Health Update: Day 142 Post-Transplant

It's now been 142 days since the transplant on November 18th, looks like this is only the second time I've written about this since I came home in early December.

Around day 30 they did a chimerism test, to look at my white blood cells and see how many were from me and how many were from the donor, and it was good, indicating all donor. On day 102 they did a bone marrow biopsy and another chimerism test, and both had good results: no sign of leukemia cells, and again, all donor, no me.

So things have been going about as well as can be expected for all this. I've been gaining weight, though slowly, two steps forward one step back. They've been slowly reducing the amount of immunosuppressants I take and I should be off them completely in a few months, unless I get some of the more severe symptoms of graft-vs-host-disease. They also reduced my visits from weekly to every-other-weak recently, which is nice.

A few appointments ago the doctor told me I have very elevated levels of iron, maybe 10 times a normal amount, though he said it wasn't cause for concern. He explained how our bodies hold onto iron pretty well because meat is difficult to get in nature, and with all the blood transfusions I had last year my body accumulated a lot of excess iron. So the solution apparently is to donate blood, except in my case they'll have to throw the blood away, so it's basically blood letting. So I immediately thought of that SNL sketch with Steve Martin as the medieval barber/doctor who uses bloodletting for everything — "Gilda, get the leeches!" (And according to that wikiepdia article this sketch was done a few times, which might explain why that quote I just used isn't in the transcript I found. Or my memory might be wrong.)

So we haven't started doing that yet but it'll be once a month for a while until my iron is in a more normal range.

In general I'm feeling alright. I've been working on modeling jewelry again and am working to better organize how I share it here, I'm enjoying that a lot.

I'm trying to embed that SNL sketch below but it doesn't seem to work, I can't even get it to play when I go to the site, but here is a link if you're interested. Or if you have Hulu apparently it's on there too.

Edit: figures, now that I'm ready to post this the embedding seems to be working, thanks NBC! (Or maybe not, seems touchy.) (Click the "read more" link below to see it... maybe.)

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